Life in the 1920’s

Life in the 1920’s

Swing It! Historic Swing Culture History Life in the 1920’s Life in the 1930’s Musicians Vintage Fashion Current Swing Culture Swing World Map Swing Events Current Bands Gordon Webster Meschiya Lake & The Little Big Horns Miss Jubilee Spicy Pickles Jazz Band Event Reviews Dance Instructional Videos Beginner Lindy Hop Lindy Hop Tips for Dancers Vintage Dancers Shorty George Snowden Current Dancers Scene Building Leader Tools Leader Resources Life in the 1920's Discover the advent of the Jazz Age Flappers – The Roaring Twenties by vintageswingmovement@gmail.com | Mar 8, 2015 | History, Life in the 1920's Life in the 1920’s by vintageswingmovement@gmail.com | Aug 11, 2013 | Classic Culture, Life in the 1920's A 1920’s view of the future by vintageswingmovement@gmail.com | Aug 11, 2013 | Classic Culture, Life in the...
The Birth of Lindy Hop

The Birth of Lindy Hop

Swing It! Historic Swing Culture History Life in the 1920’s Life in the 1930’s Musicians Vintage Fashion Current Swing Culture Swing World Map Swing Events Current Bands Gordon Webster Meschiya Lake & The Little Big Horns Miss Jubilee Spicy Pickles Jazz Band Event Reviews Dance Instructional Videos Beginner Lindy Hop Lindy Hop Tips for Dancers Vintage Dancers Shorty George Snowden Current Dancers Scene Building Leader Tools Leader Resources   The Birth of Lindy Hop Hot Jazz filled the club in Harlem, New York, in the 1920s and 1930s and dancers filled the floor to dance the charleston, texas tommy, and the breakaway but as the music changed so did the dance.  The hot jazz music began to have a certain swing and dancers wanting to match the changing style of the music experimented and created a new dance style The Lindy Hop.  Born in the Savoy Ballroom in Harlem, New York and popularized during the Swing era of the late 1930s and early 1940s, Lindy was a fusion of many dances that preceded it or were popular during its development.       It wasn’t until the opening of the Savoy Ballroom in Harlem, New York in 1926 that the dance was introduced to the broader American culture.  Unlike many ballrooms such as the Cotton Club, the Savoy always had a no-discrimination policy. Started by white entrepreneur Jay Faggen and Jewish businessman Moe Gale the ballroom was managed by African-American real estate business man Charles Buchanon.  Generally, the clientele was 85% black and 15% white, although sometimes there was an even 50/50 split. Lindy hop legend Frankie Manning noted that patrons were only judged on...